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Affordable, Long Lasting Dental Solutions in Cancun – Sunset Dental Cancun- Cancun’s Award winning Dental Specialists

For people wanting Dental treatments there are many options available. The latest and more interesting way is to combine a Vacation and dental work in another country.

Mexico has always been a popular destination for American and Canadians and the largest  and most popular place is Cancun with it’s numerous attractions, historical past mixed with beautiful weather and white beaches crystal clear waters it really has something for everyone.

Cancun has steadily grown and developed into a buzzing destination which attracts young, old and families alike. With this selection of people the Dental Tourism  industry as it is now known boomed and the American and Canadian tourists are finding that even though Dentistry is not every one’s favorite subject it is how ever a necessity that is costly back home.

Dental Treatments in Cancun can cost as much as 60% less than the exact same treatments in the United States. Now people want to know that any dental procedure is completed with the same care and strict attention to quality and hygiene as back home and this is where Sunset Dental Cancun has placed it’s services.

Sunset Dental Cancun is the Premier All Speciality Dental Treatment center located in the heart of Cancun’s Hotel Zone with a top of the range office using only the very best materials with the latest equipment and staff that are the best in their chosen fields of expertise.

Sunset Dental Cancun honestly wants to help the people who enter their clinic, Health is the most important gift we as people have and this is the guiding light for achieving correct and long-lasting dental treatments.

On an initial consultation with Sunset Dental Cancun as much information is gathered and an extensive clinical evaluation completed so a personalized treatment plan can be offered with breakdowns in appointments, prices and outcome it is all based on Mutual respect and Trust.

Did you know that a Dental Implant in the United States for only the first stage can cost 2500 usd for just one! and at Sunset Dental Cancun the very same Dental Implant from the same company using the same instruments and doctors who have passed the same exams and professional levels can only cost 1100 usd each! that is a HUGE saving  if needing multiple  Implants  then the savings can literally be in the Thousands.

A Porcelain Crown for example can be as much as 1000 dollars in the United States but at Sunset Dental Cancun can be cost only 550 usd with no hidden charges, No laboratory fees, no Temporary fees, no Placing of the Crown costs.

There are many many clinics offering great savings and unbelievable results but Dentistry should be approached with care and realization that it is a medical procedure and your health is priority so Sunset Dental Cancun invites you to contact them and see for yourself, have a look at why Infection control in our office is a priority to us.

To protect our patients and ourselves, we strictly maintain sterilization and cross contamination processes using standards recommended by the American Dental Association (ADA), the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and the Center for Disease Control (CDC)

At Sunset Dental we do not perform any unnecessary work and that sounds like something obvious but remember people make money from the amount of work you need. The treatments offered by our professionals will be based on finding out what matters to you and a comprehensive clinical evaluation, this is a partnership.

The treatments that Sunset Dental provide to families young and old are completed with genuine Care and compassion a level which has been worked on and refined so as to ensure all people who call in at this clinic leave knowing it was the very best decision they had made.

GIVING YOU SOMETHING TO SMILE ABOUT……………………………

http://www.sunsetdentalcancun.com/

info@sunsetdentalcancun.com

052 998 176 8084

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10 TOOTHBRUSHING MISTAKES

 

Toothbrushing is such an ingrained habit, few people think twice about it. But as with any habit, you can get sloppy, and that can lead to cavities and gum disease.

Here, dentists and oral health experts point out 10 common toothbrushing mistakes and how to fix them.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 1: Not Using the Right Toothbrush

Consider the size of your mouth when picking a toothbrush, says Richard H. Price, DMD, the consumer advisor for the American Dental Association. “If you are straining to open wide enough to let the brush in, the brush is probably too big,” he says.

”The handle has to be comfortable,” he says. It should feel as comfortable as holding a fork when you eat.

“The more comfortable it is in your mouth and your hand, then the more likely you will use it and use it properly,” he says.

Which is the better toothbrush: Electric or manual?

“It’s an individual preference,” says Michael Sesemann, DDS, president of the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry and an Omaha dentist. “A person who brushes well with a manual will do as well as a person who brushes well with an electric.”

Price agrees. “It’s not the toothbrush, it’s the brusher.”

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 2: Not Picking the Right Bristle

Some toothbrushes have angled bristles, others straight. So is one type better? Dentists interviewed by WebMD say no.

”It’s more related to technique than the way the bristles come out,” says Sesemann.

What is important when buying a toothbrush? Bristles that are too stiff can aggravate the gums. The ADA recommends a soft-bristled brush.

”Bristles should be sturdy enough to remove plaque but not hard enough to damage [the teeth] when used properly,” Price says. He doesn’t recommend “natural” bristles such as those made from animal hair or boar bristle.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 3: Not Brushing Often Enough or Long Enough

Softly brushing your teeth at least twice a day is recommended, ”Three times a day is best,” Sesemann says.

With too much time between brushings, he says, bacterial plaque will build up, boosting the risk of gum inflammation and other problems.

Brushing should last at least two minutes, Sesemann tells WebMD. Three minutes is even better, Price says.

Most people fall short of both time lines, Sesemann says. “It’s an arbitrary number, but it’s just so people take the time to clean all the surfaces.” He often recommends people divide the mouth into quadrants and spend 30 seconds a quadrant. Some electric toothbrushes include built-in timers.

To make the two minutes go faster, Sesemann says he ”multitasks,” fitting in a little TV viewing as he brushes.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 4: Brushing Too Often or Too Hard

While brushing your teeth three times a day is ideal, more may not be, Sesemann says. “More than four toothbrushings a day would begin to seem compulsive,” he says.

Excessive brushing could expose the root of the tooth to irritation, and that could in turn irritate the gums. Brushing vigorously can also erode tooth enamel. The trick is to brush very gently for two to three minutes.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 5: Not Brushing Correctly

”Long horizontal strokes along the gumline can lead to abrasions,” says Sesemann. “Aim your bristles at the gumline at a 45-degree angle and do short strokes or vibrations.” Softly brush up and down your teeth, not across your teeth. The strokes should be vertical or circular, not horizontal.

Be sure to brush outer and inner tooth surfaces, the chewing surfaces, and your tongue.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 6: Starting in the Same Place Each Time

Many people start brushing the same part of their mouth over and over, dentists find.

“Start in a different place so that you don’t get ‘lazy’ in the same area of your mouth,” Price suggests. He reasons that by the time you get to the last quadrant of your mouth, you’re bored with brushing.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 7: Skipping Inner Tooth Surfaces

Most people forget to brush the inner surfaces of teeth – the surface that your tongue presses against.

“The plaque you can’t see is just as important to remove as the plaque you can see,” Price says.

The most commonly skipped area, dentists say, is the inner surface of the lower front teeth.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 8: Not Following Up With a Rinse

Bacteria can grow on an un-rinsed toothbrush. Then, the next time you brush your teeth, you may actually put old bacteria back in your mouth, says Laurence Rifkin, DDS, a dentist in Beverly Hills, Calif.

Rinsing the toothbrush after you brush will help remove any leftover toothpaste, too.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 9: Not Letting the Toothbrush Dry

“If you have a toothbrush that’s perpetually moist, it will cultivate more bacteria,” Sesemann says.

“if the bristles stay soggy, you can misshape them as you use the brush,” Price says. “Or it might be a breeding ground for bacteria.”

It’s a good idea to shake out the moisture, then recap it with a cap that allows air in, he says.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 10: Not Changing the Toothbrush Often Enough

The American Dental Association recommends a new brush every three or four months, or even sooner if the bristles look frayed.

But rather than go by a strict timeline, he says a visual inspection of the bristles is better. “Once the bristles lose their normal flexibility and start to break apart, change your toothbrush,” he says.

“Look more at the state of the bristles than the time period,” he says.

Some brushes have colored indicators that alert you when they need replacing, Price says.

WebMD Feature

By  Kathleen Doheny

Reviewed By Steve Drescher, DDS

 

AFFORDABLE DENTISTRY IN CANCUN – COST NOT FEAR KEEPS PEOPLE AWAY FROM DENTIST

AFFORDABLE DENTISTRY IN CANCUN – COST NOT FEAR KEEPS PEOPLE AWAY FROM DENTIST.

AFFORDABLE DENTISTRY IN CANCUN – COST NOT FEAR KEEPS PEOPLE AWAY FROM DENTIST

 

COST IS A BIGGER FACTOR THAN FEAR WHEN IT’S TIME TO VISIT THE DENTIST, A new government report shows.

The national survey on oral health shows 4 out of 10 adults in the U.S. say cost is the main reason they don’t visit the dentist with an oral health problem like a toothache or loose teeth”in the past six months.”

Fear was the motivating factor to forgo the dentist for only 1 in 10 adults when they had an oral health problem.

Researchers say the results suggest cost and lack of dental coverage is a major factor influencing oral health in the U.S.

Overall, the study shows about three-quarters of adults aged 18-64 in 2008 had very good or good oral health, 17% had fair, and 7% had poor.

People with Medicaid were almost five times as likely as adults with private health insurance to have poor oral health.

What your teeth say about you

Oral Health in the U.S.

In 2000, the U.S. surgeon general issued a report calling attention to the “silent epidemic” of dental and oral diseases in the U.S. and emphasizing the need for more information about the status of peoples’ oral health.

In this study, researchers analyzed information from the 2008 National Health Interview Survey to check on the status of oral health in the U.S.

The results show 6 out of 10 adults aged 18-64 visited a dentist or other dental health professional “within the past year.”

Researchers found several health and economic factors were related to oral health and frequency of dentist visits. For example:

  • People with diabetes were nearly twice as likely to have worse oral health than others the same age without diabetes (29% vs. 16%).
  • People with diabetes were also nearly twice as likely as those without diabetes to have not visited a dentist in more than five years.
  • Those in poor families were more than twice as likely as adults in families that were not poor to have worse oral health than others (28% vs. 13%).
  • Among those with one or more mouth or tooth problems, more than half who were uninsured had an unmet dental need due to cost, vs. one-tenth of those with private health insurance.

Education also seemed to play a role in overall oral health. The study shows people with less than a high school diploma were nearly twice as likely to have poorer oral health than others their age (39% vs. 20%).

Information sourced and provided By Jennifer Warner WebMD Health News

 

Then why not check out alternative options to help improve the cost of those much needed Dental treatments with a “Dental Vacation” Sunset Dentasl Cancun is a Leading Dental Clinic who offers not only more affordable dental treatments (around 50-60% cheaper) but promise the exact same high standards as you would expect back home.

“We want to help make a positive impact on the lives of our patients” your health is our priority:

 

 

 

COMPARE THE SAVINGS WITH SUNSET DENTAL CANCUN –

 

TREATMENTS UNITED STATES SUNSET DENTAL
DENTAL IMPLANTS 1st Stage 2000-2500 USD 1000-1200 USD
DENTAL IMPLANTS 2nd Stage 1000-1600 USD 750 USD
MINI IMPLANTS 900-1100 USD 450 USD
PORCELAIN FUSED CROWN 900-1200 USD 470 USD
ZIRCONIA CROWN 1000-1400 USD 560 USD
RE TREATMENT   ROOT CANAL THERAPY 600-1000 USD 300 USD
ROOT CANAL THERAPY 500-900 USD 250 USD
ENDO POST 190-300 USD 120 USD
PULPECTOMY 500-1000 USD 250 USD
PORCELAIN VENEERS 1000-1200 USD 470-550 USD
LUMINEERS 1000-1400 USD 550 USD
DENTURES 1000-1300 USD PER ARC 700 USD PER ARC
EXTRACTIONS SURGICAL 200-500 USD 150-250 USD
EXTRACTIONS NON SURGICAL 190-300 USD 90-150 USD
SEDATION OPTIONS 2000 USD 450 USD
SINUS ELEVATION 3000 USD 1000 USD
BONE GRAFTS 500-1500 USD PER GRAM 450 USD
TEETH WHITENING 600 USD 150.200 USD
CLEANINGS 120 USD 60 USD
WHITE COMPOSITE FILLINGS 300 USD 89 USD
PORCELAIN INLAY/ONLY 400-800 USD 250 USD
AMALGAM REMOVALS 500-800 USD 180-320 USD
BONDING PER TOOTH 250 USD 90 USD
CONSULTATION: 50 + USD FREE
EMERGENCY CONSULTATION: 150 + USD 50 USD REFUNDABLE

 

For More Information on how to receive the very best Treatments at Affordable prices:

info@sunsetdentalcancun.com or call 0052 998 1768084 or check our website www.sunsetdentalcancun.com

 

The Ugly Truth About Your Toothbrush

 

Your toothbrush may be nastier than you think. Find out when to ditch it.

Do you know what’s lurking on your toothbrush?

Your toothbrush is loaded with germs, say researchers at England’s University of Manchester. They’ve found that one uncovered toothbrush can harbor more than 100 million bacteria, including E. coli bacteria, which can cause diarrhea, and staphylococci (“staph”) bacteria that cause skin infections.

But don’t panic. Your mouth wasn’t exactly sterile to begin with.

 

Mouthful of Bacteria

“The bottom line is, there [are] hundreds of microorganisms in our mouths every day,” says Gayle McCombs, RDH, MS, associate professor and director of the Dental Hygiene Research Center at Old Dominion University.

That’s no big deal. Problems only start when there is an unhealthy balance of bacteria in the mouth. McCombs says.

“It’s important to remember that plaque — the stuff you’re removing from your teeth — is bacteria,” says dentist Kimberly Harms, DDS, consumer advisor for the American Dental Association. “So you’re putting bacteria on your toothbrush every time you brush your teeth.”

 

Could Your Toothbrush Be Making You Sick?

Probably not. Regardless of how many bacteria live in your mouth, or have gotten in there via your toothbrush, your body’s natural defenses make it highly unlikely that you’re going to catch an infection simply from brushing your teeth.

“Fortunately, the human body is usually able to defend itself from bacteria,” Harms says. “So we aren’t aware of any real evidence that sitting the toothbrush in your bathroom in the toothbrush holder is causing any real damage or harm. We don’t know that the bacteria on there are translating into infections.”

Still, you should exercise some common sense about storing your toothbrush, including how close it is to the toilet.

 

Don’t Brush Where You Flush

Most bathrooms are small. And in many homes, the toilet is pretty close to the bathroom sink where you keep your toothbrush.

Every toilet flush sends a spray of bacteria into the air. And you don’t want the toilet spray anywhere near your open toothbrush.

“You don’t store your plates and glasses by the toilet, so why would you want to place your toothbrush there?” McCombs says. “It’s just common sense to store your toothbrush as far away from the toilet as possible.”

You also wouldn’t eat after going to the bathroom without first washing your hands. The same advice applies before brushing your teeth, McCombs says.

 

Toothbrush Storage Tips

Once you’ve moved your toothbrush away from the toilet, here are a few other storage tips to keep your brush as germ-free as possible:

 

  • Keep it rinsed. Wash off your toothbrush thoroughly with tap water every time you use it.
  • Keep it dry. “Bacteria love a moist environment,” Harms says. Make sure your brush has a chance to dry thoroughly between brushings. Avoid using toothbrush covers, which can create a moist enclosed breeding ground for bacteria.
  • Keep it upright. Store your toothbrush upright in a holder, rather than lying it down.
  • Keep it to yourself.No matter how close you are to your sister, brother, spouse, or roommate, don’t ever use their toothbrush. Don’t even store your toothbrush side-by-side in the same cup with other people’s brushes. Whenever toothbrushes touch, they can swap germs.

 

  • Do Toothbrush Sanitizers Really Work?
  • Various products pledge to sanitize your toothbrush. Some say they kill bacteria with heat or ultraviolet light, germ-killing sprays, or rinses. Others have built-in antibacterial bristles.
  • There’s evidence that at least some of these products do effectively kill germs. But there’s no real proof that using any toothbrush sanitizer will reduce your risk of getting sick.
  • If you choose to use one of these products, make sure that it has been reviewed by the FDA, which checks the validity of consumer health product marketing claims.
  • Remember that even the best products won’t kill all the germs on your toothbrush. At best, they’ll kill 99.9% of the germs.
  • That means if you have one million bacteria on your toothbrush to start, you’ll still have about 1,000 remaining when you’re finished sanitizing, Harms says.
  • Some web sites recommend putting your toothbrush into the microwave oven or dishwasher to sanitize it. Although these methods will kill some of the bacteria, they will probably damage your toothbrush in the process. It’s better to just buy disposable brushes and throw them out.

 

  • When to Toss Your Toothbrush
  • The best way to limit the bacteria on your toothbrush is to replace it on a regular basis.
  • The American Dental Association recommends throwing out your toothbrush every three to four months. If the bristles become frayed, you’re sick, or you have a weak immune system, throw it out even more often. If you use an electric toothbrush, throw out the head as often as you’d discard a disposable toothbrush.
  • Every time you’re tempted to skip brushing and flossing your teeth, remember how many bacteria lurk in your mouth – and what they can do.
  • “It’s bacteria that cause gum disease, and decay, and bad breath,” Harms says. “Make sure you’re brushing and flossing as often as possible to eliminate some of those bacteria.” Rinsing your mouth with an antibacterial mouthwash before or after brushing can also help reduce plaque-causing bacteria that can lead to gingivitis, an early, mild form of gum disease.

 

 

Information sourced and provided by

WebMD Feature

By Stephanie Watson

Reviewed By Alfred D. Wyatt Jr., DMD

 

TOP TIPS FOR BEATING BAD BREATH

Worried about bad breath? You’re not alone. Forty million Americans suffer from bad breath, or halitosis, according to the American Dental Hygienists’ Association. Bad breath can get in the way of your social life. It can make you self-conscious and embarrassed. Fortunately, there are simple and effective ways to freshen your breath.

 

1. Brush and floss more frequently.

One of the prime causes of bad breath is plaque, the sticky build-up on teeth that harbors bacteria. Food left between teeth adds to the problem. All of us should brush at least twice a day and floss daily. If you’re worried about your breath, brush and floss a little more often. But don’t overdo it. Brushing too aggressively can erode enamel, making your teeth more vulnerable to decay.

2. Scrape your tongue.

The coating that normally forms on the tongue can harbor foul-smelling bacteria. To eliminate them, gently brush your tongue with your toothbrush. Some people find that toothbrushes are too big to comfortably reach the back of the tongue. In that case, try a tongue scraper. “Tongue scrapers are an essential tool in a proper oral health care routine,” says Pamela L. Quinones, RDH, president of the American Dental Hygienists’ Association. “They’re designed specifically to apply even pressure across the surface of the tongue area, removing bacteria, food debris, and dead cells that brushing alone can’t remove.”

3. Avoid foods that sour your breath.

Onions and garlic are the prime offenders. “Unfortunately, brushing after you eat onions or garlic doesn’t help,” says dentist Richard Price, DMD, a spokesperson for the American Dental Association. “The volatile substances they contain make their way into your blood stream and travel to your lungs, where you breathe them out.” The only way to avoid the problem is to avoid eating onions and garlic, especially before social or work occasions when you’re concerned about your breath.

4. Kick the habit.

Bad breath is just one of many reasons not to smoke. Smoking damages gum tissue and stains teeth. It also increases your risk of oral cancer. Over-the-counter nicotine patches can help tame the urge to smoke. If you need a little help, make an appointment to talk to your doctor about prescription medications or smoking cessation programs that can help you give up tobacco for good.

5. Rinse your mouth out.

In addition to freshening your breath, anti-bacterial mouthwashes add extra protection by reducing plaque-causing bacteria. After eating, swishing your mouth with plain water also helps freshen your breath by eliminating food particles.

6. Skip after-dinner mints and chew gum instead.

Sugary candies promote the growth of bacteria in your mouth and add to bad breath problems. Instead, chew sugarless gum. “Gum stimulates saliva, which is the mouth’s natural defense mechanism against plaque acids which cause tooth decay and bad breath,”

7. Keep your gums healthy.

Gum disease, also known as periodontal disease, is a common cause of bad breath. Bacteria accumulate in pockets at the base of teeth, creating bad odors. If you have gum disease, your dentist may recommend a periodontist, who specializes in treating gum disease.

8. Be alert to dry mouth.

Lack of saliva promotes tooth decay and can cause bad breath. If your mouth is dry, drink plenty of water during the day. Chew sugarless gum or suck on sugarless hard candy, which helps stimulate saliva. Use a humidifier at night if the air is dry. If your mouth is still unusually dry, talk to your dentist or doctor. Dry mouth is a side effect of certain medications.

9. See your doctor.

If your bad breath continues despite your best efforts, see your doctor. Bad breath can be a symptom of medical conditions such as a sinus infection, postnasal drip from allergies, lung infections, diabetes, or liver or kidney diseases

 

Information sourced and supplied by WebMD.

 

For more information on how Sunset Dental Cancun can help with all aspects of your Oral Health contact info@sunsetdentalcancun.com or call 0052 998 176 8084

AFFORDABLE DENTISTRY IN CANCUN

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